Tulsa Children's Museum of Art presents...

Greenwood, Black Wall Street, and the 1921 Race Massacre: Through the Eyes of Children

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The exhibition Greenwood, Black Wall Street, and the 1921 Massacre: Through the Eyes of Children is Tulsa’s first historical art museum experience for children, by children. The museum is partnering with schools, teachers, historical societies, and art schools and foundations to solicit visual art submissions from Oklahoma’s school-age children, prekindergarten to twelfth grade. The project adds a rich learning and sensory experience to the commemoration of the 1921 Race Massacre’s Centennial. The art collection will include a cross section of visual representations from differing socioeconomic statuses, ethnicities, ages, and genders . There are four categories for submissions: 1) Greenwood in Tulsa, 2) Black Wall Street, 3) 1921 Tulsa Massacre, 4) Futuristic Tulsa/Greenwood. Each category will be represented within its own gallery.

Greenwood, Black Wall Street, and the 1921 Race Massacre: Through the Eyes of Children aspires to address the lack of awareness and need for education about the historic Greenwood District, Black Wall Street, and the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. The Tulsa Children’s Museum of Art helps to educate people of all ages throughout Oklahoma, the United States, and the world abroad through visual arts, curriculum guides, workshops, and symposiums. It offers an opportunity for children to participate in and lead valuable discussions about history, mode of genres, and reconciliation. TCMA aims to promote and foster empowerment of voice and differing perspectives. The exhibition Greenwood, Black Wall Street, and the 1921 Massacre: Through the Eyes of Children Art is a significant contribution to  Tulsa’s future and legacy, exploring a traumatic past through the healing processes of creative arts. Furthermore, the analysis of tragedy through the innocence of children bridges gaps and cultivates forgiveness and hope.

The exhibition will explore the events of Tulsa’s past, present, and future, capturing a range of visual voices commemorating the history of Greenwood and imagining its future. Tulsa Children's Museum of Art is calling on school children of all ages including seekers of inclusion, lovers of artistic expression, global learners, history buffs, and storytellers, etc. to submit visual art pieces of all forms for display in the museum. Submissions are due May 20, 2021.

Please contact Dr. Courtney Skipper at (918) 973-1315 or email drcourtneyskipper@tulsachildrensmuseumofart.org for more information.

 

The Massacre's Most Vulnerable Victims

The Red Cross cared for many of Tulsa's orphans after their parents were killed in the Massacre. 

"Uncovering the Greenwood Massacre, Nearly a Century Later", June 14, 2020, 60 Minutes.